Bio

Photo by Dallas Curow

Photo by Dallas Curow

Andrew deWaard is a PhD Candidate in the Cinema and Media Studies program at the Theatre, Film and Television department at the University of California, Los Angeles. His co-authored book entitled The Cinema of Steven Soderbergh: indie sex, corporate lies and digital videotape was published by Columbia University Press/Wallflower. His articles have appeared in Cinephile and IASPM@Journal, and he has chapters in multiple anthologies, including Habitus of the ’Hood, The Philosophy of Steven Soderbergh, Fight the Power!: The Spike Lee Reader, and The Business of Entertainment: Popular Music. He has presented at multiple conferences across North America and Europe, including the Society for Cinema and Media Studies, the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, the Canadian Communications Association, and the Film Studies Association of Canada.

His research interests exhibit an interdisciplinary combination of media studies, political economy, and critical theory applied to the film, television, and popular music industries. With a graduate certificate in the Digital Humanities from UCLA, he employs a computational and cultural data-centred approach to his humanistic inquiries. His specific research focuses include: the cultural industries, financial capital, media concentration, cultural capital, authorship, and intertextuality.

Photo by Dallas Curow

Photo by Dallas Curow

Andrew is also the co-investigator of the UCIRA-funded collaborative research project called “The Cultural Capital Project: Radical Monetization of the Music Industry” that explores the historical antecedents, theoretical trajectories, legal ramifications, and technical components involved in the creation of a non-profit patronage system and social network uniting musical artists and fans. The system will harvest user-generated data of listening and sharing habits and then use an algorithm to allocate equitable compensation via distributed micropayment. Incorporating the multitude of individuals who propel the cultural industries with their creative labour, including fans, photographers, artists, labels, and others, the Cultural Capital project aims to establish a ‘radical monetization’ of the music industry based on equity, connectivity, and sharing.

He is the recipient of a Chancellor’s Fellowship from UCLA and a Doctoral Fellowship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. His most recent awards include the Otis Ferguson Memorial Award in Critical Writing from UCLA, a Student Writing Award from the Society for Cinema and Media Studies, and the Jack K. Sauter Award from UCLA. He earned his M.A. in Film Studies from the University of British Columbia and his B.A. in Media, Information and Technoculture and Film Studies from the University of Western Ontario.